Was 407 information stolen for political gain?

Bell Media has learned of new suggestions that the driver information stolen from 407 may have been used for political gain.

That is according to sources talking to Bell media and the National Post.

The company running the 407 reported an internal theft of names, addresses, and in some cases phone numbers from 60, 000 customers. It occurred sometime in the past 12 months.

According to the 407, the information is not likely to lead to identity theft, so why would someone want it?

Sources indicate it’s possible the data may have been used to recruit new PC Party members.

Shortly after the data breach became public, Simmer Sandhu, the PC candidate for Brampton East resigned from his role, citing unspecified allegations against him involving his "work life" and "my nomination campaign."

Sandhu denies the allegations and believes he will be cleared.

A PC party spokeswoman says Sandhu's resignation has been accepted.

Melissa Lantsman says the party is excited to announce Surdeep Verma as its new candidate in Brampton East, calling him a great addition to the PC team.

The National Post claims to have seen some of the stolen information and reports that it may have been used to help recruit party members during nominations races before Ontario's June election.

Signing up new members can be a big help to those trying to win local races and run for a seat at Queen's Park.

According to the National Post, the stolen information can be tied it to a PC organizer who had been helping potential candidates.

That organizer insists he knows nothing about the 407 breach.

PC leader Doug Ford walked away from questions shouted out at an event on Wednesday night.

The Liberals call the allegations disturbing.