Mick Jagger Mocks President Trump At Massachusettes Stones Show

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Mick Jagger took time out to poke fun of Donald Trump's much mocked July 4th speech. Rolling Stone reported that during the Rolling Stones' sold-out concert last night (July 7th) at show at Foxborough, Massachusetts’ Gillette Stadium, Jagger said he hoped that audience had a great July 4th weekend, before admitting that the Fourth of July has always been a "touchy holiday for us Brits."

Jagger went on to joke: "In fact, the President made a very good point in his speech the other night. He said, 'If only the British had held on to the airports, the whole thing might have gone differently for us.'"

Both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards had been critical of the former casino owner's ascent to the highest elected office, with the Stones consistently asking Trump to stop using their music at his campaign rallies.

Last year, Jagger went on record saying that he was particularly confused by Trump's choice of "You Can't Always Get What You Want," recalling to the BBC: "He used it on everything. He used it on every rally through the election campaign. I wasn't the DJ obviously, but if I was Donald's DJ. . . it's a funny song for your play-out song. When he finished the speech, he played this out, this sort of doomy ballad about drugs in Chelsea. It's kind of weird if you think about it, but he couldn't be persuaded to use something else, it was an odd thing, very odd."

Despite co-writing such songs as "Street Fighting Man," "Salt Of The Earth," "Undercover Of The Night," "Blinded By Rainbows," and "Sweet Neo Con," Mick Jagger explained that he's never really been a political animal, and tries to stay as independent as he possibly can in regards to his tastes and beliefs: "I was never very keen on joining political parties. And when I was at college, I was at a very left-wing college, and I never felt the joining of it, y'know? I like football and I support Arsenal (football club). I'm not a rabid supporter, I'm not really a kind of joiner or scarf-wearer."