Never Released 1972 Marvin Gaye Album Coming In March

In celebration of Marvin Gaye’s 80th birthday on April 2nd, Motown/UMe will release his never-issued 1972 album You’re The Man in a double-album gatefold vinyl and digital editions on March 29th. You’re The Man features all of Gaye’s solo and non-soundtrack recordings from 1972, with most of the album’s tracks making their vinyl release debuts. SaLaAM ReMi’s new mix of the album track "My Last Chance" is available now for streaming and for immediate download with album pre-order.

According to the album's press release, following the massive success of the previous year's What's Going On album, "His new single, 'You’re The Man' -- a percolating, sarcastic riff on political non-action issued as the U.S. presidential campaign was kicking off -- reached Number Seven on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart. He saw Motown schedule a You’re The Man album (for release) but when the lead single didn’t cross over (to the pop charts), stalling at Number 50, Marvin retreated. Ambivalent about recording, stubborn about moving to Los Angeles with Berry Gordy and Motown, Marvin by his actions proclaimed no more new Marvin Gaye music. Or so it seemed. In this singular and transitional year for the late music legend, Gaye recorded more than an album’s worth of music in Detroit and L.A. He produced himself, None of these tracks or any other on the LP, except the single, were issued at the time."

Legendary producer, Chic co-founder and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Nile Rodgers shed light on the changes Marvin Gaye brought to Motown: "When I watched Motown go from what I would call a real slick pop place to, sort of, more politically-based R&B -- y'know when Marvin Gaye did What's Going On and (sings) 'and rockets, moon. . . ' and that stuff (sings) 'make you wanna '-- 'Inner City Blues' and all of that kinda stuff. And it was just amazing to me because not only did they have that, but all of a sudden the vibe of Motown changed and they started getting the self-contained bands and the edgier, sort of, R&B stuff. That was, like, and amazing era of Motown to me."