Sidewalks Cause Debate in South Windsor Neighbourhood

A south Windsor neighbourhood is getting new sidewalks and a pedestrian crossing despite pushback from some members of the community.

The area in question is Labelle St. and Northway Ave where several residents are against the plan as they'll be losing one or two driveway parking spaces and a portion of their front lawns.

With Bellewood public school in the neighbourhood and heavy foot traffic throughout the day, the majority of council voted in favour of the plan stating public safety should trump parking.

Carlin Miller is a parent in the area and says it's a busy area that needs to be improved.

"It makes safe passage for children going to school, children going to the park and for people using the trails. Whether these are families with young children, kids in strollers, older adults with a wheelchair or walker, what we wanted was a safe way for them to get from houses in the neighbourhood to the park and the trail way system."

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The proposed location of a new pedestrian crossing at Labelle St. and Northway Ave (Photo courtesy of the City of Windsor)

Miller says the change is going to improve the quality of life for the whole community.

"I have a sixth grade and a fourth grade boy, both boys, and the problem that we have is they're not able to walk to school or to the park alone. So my husband and I walk them both directions everyday. We're happy to do that, but it's busy and it's often quite unsafe."

Marc Frey is a local parent as well and says common sense prevailed.

"For me, and I can only speak for myself, it seems obvious that the safety of the kids in our community, the safety of our older adults in our community, the safety of those with mobility issues in the community should be the number one priority. We should be looking out for our community. So I think it's common sense."

The entire project, which includes sidewalks on Labelle St. and Northway Ave with a crossover at that intersection, will cost the city just under $240,000.