VIDEO: Cold Doesn't Freeze Annual E-Waste Collection

The unrelenting deep freeze in Windsor-Essex isn't enough to stop people from donating — or getting rid of — old electronics and other appliances.

Habitat for Humanity Windsor-Essex held its annual collection of electronic waste and small appliances on Saturday. Volunteers set up at both Home Depot locations in Windsor to haul off old TVs, VCRs and even Christmas lights dropped off by area residents.

Last year 400,000 lbs of goods were collected.

While final numbers aren't known yet, John Trach with Habitat for Humanity was shocked to see the number of people turning up in the cold to donate.

"Honestly, yeah I was very surprised at the turnout. It's been great, unbelievable — everybody's been very kind and helpful," says Trach.

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Habitat for Humanity volunteers collect electronic waste and other donations that will be recycled to generate funds for the non-profit while other items end up in the Habitat ReStore. Photo taken January 6, 2018. (Photo by Ricardo Veneza)

Habitat for Humanity is able to recycle the donated goods with most of the steel, glass and other parts removed to be made into new products. Funds raised through recycling the electronics and appliances has also helped the non-profit build homes.

Trach was worried the cold would keep people from coming out but was surprised at the turnout.

"It's been absolutely unbelievable," says Trach. "The people have come out in bunches, we've had lineups all day long. It's just starting to slow down now but, this is our third bin now — we'll probably fill this bin up completely to the top."

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Habitat for Humanity volunteers collect electronic waste and other donations that will be recycled to generate funds for the non-profit while other items end up in the Habitat ReStore. Photo taken January 6, 2018. (Photo by Ricardo Veneza)

Trach says a lot of old TVs were donated — and he's happy to have them.

"Basically anything with a chord on the end of it, any electronics working or not — we can take them and recycle them and saves them from ending up in the dumpsters and landfills and it's helping us at the same time," says Trach.

Habitat for Humanity says it's been able to make home ownership a reality for 62 families in Windsor-Essex through its efforts.

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Habitat for Humanity volunteers collect electronic waste and other donations that will be recycled to generate funds for the non-profit while other items end up in the Habitat ReStore. Photo taken January 6, 2018. (Photo by Ricardo Veneza)