Not 'convenient' to discuss charges against imprisoned Canadians: China

A Chinese government spokesman says it is not 'convenient' to discuss the charges against two Canadians detained in China despite an assertion by the country's top prosecutor that they broke the law.

Foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang offered that explanation during a press conference in Beijing today, one of two cryptic Chinese government media events that deepened the mystery surrounding the arrests of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor.

The two were detained last month in what is widely viewed as Chinese retaliation for Canada's arrest of high-tech executive Meng Wanzhou, Huawei's chief financial officer, by the RCMP in Vancouver at the request of the United States.

The U.S. wants Meng to face fraud charges in the U.S. and she has been released on bail and is living in an upscale Vancouver home in advance of her extradition hearing.

Little is known about Kovrig's or Spavor's circumstances, because they've each had only a single consular visit by Canada's ambassador to China, John McCallum, last month.

China's chief prosecutor, Zhang Jun, told a Beijing briefing today "without a doubt'' Kovrig and Spavor broke the country's laws and are being investigated.