Handling of high drivers, border crossers still being ironed out

Days before recreational cannabis use becomes legal in Canada, federal officials acknowledge many details of the new regime have yet to be worked out.

Two provinces have not signed funding deals to train officers on detecting drivers who are high, and officials suggest multiple police forces are still sorting out how to take blood samples required to prove three new impaired-driving offences.

Officials also say they have yet to receive clarity from American officials over whether someone who invests in a cannabis producer can be banned from entering the United States.

Anyone entering Canada will be asked to declare if they are carrying cannabis and, depending on the situation, they may be allowed to go free minus the pot in question.

The Liberals are sending information cards to more than 15 million households this month, running ads and slipping notes into new passports about the rules around cannabis, hoping to avoid problems before they arise.

Possession of small amounts of cannabis for recreational use will become legal Oct. 17.