Recent graduates, non-profit director among Canadian victims in Ethiopian plane crash

DARCY BELANGER

Parvati.org, a not-for-profit conservation group, says the former Edmonton resident was its founding member and director of strategic initiatives.
     
Belanger's LinkedIn profile says he was working as a United States director of professional development with PCL Construction in Denver.
     
Parvati says Belanger had taken time off from PCL and was travelling to Nairobi for the United Nations Environment Assembly.
     
The organization said he was a champion of the Marine Arctic Peace Sanctuary or MAPS because he realized the importance of the Arctic Ocean in balancing global weather patterns.
     
"Admired for his courage, outstanding achievements, and noble qualities, Darcy was a hero in every sense of the word,'' Parvati said. "He was passionately devoted to the protection of all life through the realization of MAPS.''

STEPHANIE LACROIX

LinkedIn

LinkedIn

Stephanie Lacroix was passionate about youth education and life skills development in both Canada and southern Africa.
     
Lacroix was working with the United Nations Association in Canada to help engage young Canadians in the UN's work to grow global citizens as a project officer with the association's Canada Service Corps, her LinkedIn profile says.
     
She graduated in 2015 with an honours degree in International Development and Globalization from the University of Ottawa.
     
She was a board member of the African Community Fund for Education Canada and previously volunteered with Free the Children.
     
Her mother Sylvie Lamarche Lacroix of Timmins, Ont., confirmed her death in a Facebook message.
    
In an interview, Jasveen Brar said she met Lacroix at COP24 in Poland.
     
"She was a mentor to me and the two other guys that were selected for the conference. Since the COP, we kept in touch over email, where she offered me lots of advice about my career and life, she really was a star,'' Brar said.

ANGELA REHHORN

Canadian Wildlife Federation

Angela Rehhorn, 24, was an enthusiastic conservation volunteer from Orillia, Ont., who was developing a citizen science project on bat conservation.
     
The Canadian Wildlife Federation says she had recently participated in its Canadian Conservation Corps, a volunteer program for Canadians ages 18 to 30.
     
She was on her way to participate in the United Nations Environmental Assembly in Nairobi as part of the UN Association of Canada's Canada Service Corps Program, it said.
     
Rick Bates, CEO of the Canadian Wildlife Federation, said in an interview that Rehhorn was a well-liked "outdoors girl'' who was also a great leader.
     
"She was full of excitement and the optimism of youth and wanting to change the world and work on changing the world. And that's what she was doing,'' Bates said.
     
Rehhorn recently completed a bachelor of science at Dalhousie University and was "thrilled'' to take part in the conservation corps, the federation said.
     
Her experience took her to Alberta where she went backpacking in Kananaskis this fall, then to Pacific Rim National Park on Vancouver Island for her field training.

At the time of her death, Rehhorn had just finished volunteering her time to do species surveys and was especially interested in expanding her experience working in the marine environment, the federation said.