WATCH: Here's why better police oversight in Ontario might exist only in a new, green book

The Honourable Michael Tulloch and his team have churned out hundreds of pages that spell out how to make police officers in this province more accountable to you.

The appeal court judge's 129 recommendations for the Ontario government would make police watchdog agencies like the Special Investigations Unit busier and more open, if they're put into law.

As Tulloch points out, "justice must not only be done, but also be seen to be done."

What his report might not do is satisfy the advocates who have been calling for a major change in the way information is shared about cops who are accused of behaving badly while on duty.

That's because what is absent from Tulloch's report is a call to change the current practice of keeping secret the names of police officers who have been cleared of wrongdoing by the SIU.

That was one of the key demands of activist groups like Black Lives Matter, whose protests last year pushed the provincial government to order the review of police oversight agencies.

The review is about a year in the making and is built with 12 chapters of proposed changes to everything from how watchdog groups hire investigators, to how much information they release about the cases they look into.

THE SIU SHOULD INVESTIGATE MORE OFTEN

Right now, the SIU only steps in to investigate when there are incidents involving police where a civilian is killed or seriously hurt, or where there are allegations of sexual assault.

Justice Tulloch believes the SIU should look into a wider variety of cases, including those where someone is shot at, but not necessarily injured.

He also calls for the agency to be allowed to investigate any criminal matter, "when it is in the public interest to do so."

These recommendations strike at the heart of criticism that some police officers are too quick to use drastic force in their encounters with the public, especially minorities.

THERE SHOULD BE STRICTER RULES FOR COPS

Some of the recommendations focus on spelling out in more detail how and when police agencies are expected to report incidents to the SIU.

The report says it should be the law for officers to cooperate with investigations and lay out penalties for cops who don't.

THERE SHOULD BE A FREER FLOW OF INFORMATION -- BUT NOT ALWAYS

The current practice of the SIU is to announce when it's investigations have cleared an officer of wrongdoing, but there is no obligation to explain why.

If the government takes action on Justice Tulloch's recommendations, that would change.

He calls for more information to be released about cases where police officers are not charged, such as summaries of evidence, photos, video, audio, and an explanation of why an officer was cleared and why it was legally appropriate to do so.

Tulloch, however, says releasing a cleared officer's name "would do little to advance the SIU's objectives," and that doing so "would not make a completed investigation any better."

Justice Tulloch recommends the status quo when it comes to cases where the SIU lays criminal charges against a police officer.

The current practice is to release only the officer's name, the charges laid, and the date of his or her next court appearance.

DETAILS OF CLOSED CASES SHOULD BE RELEASED

The report recommends releasing to the public the results of past investigations.

If the government turns that recommendation into law, it might give more insight into what happened in cases where police confrontations have turned violent.

However, Tulloch says that details in reports that could compromise someone's safety would have to be redacted before they are made public.