N.S. announces $128,000 for new solar energy system at Cape Breton lobster storage facility

The province says the money will support the development and installation of a 583-kilowatt ground-mounted solar energy system that will reduce overall energy demands and lower energy costs. (Facebook/ Eskasoni Corporate Division)

The Nova Scotia government announced $128,000 in funding for a new solar energy generation system for a lobster storage facility at Eskasoni Cold Logistics in Sydney, N.S.

In a news release Monday, the province says the money will support the development and installation of a 583-kilowatt ground-mounted solar energy system that will reduce overall energy demands and lower energy costs.

The project is also expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide training opportunities for community members in the installation and maintenance of solar energy systems.

"Transitioning to more renewable energy sources like solar power helps propel us toward our ambitious goal of carbon neutrality by 2050,” said Brian Comer, the minister responsible for the Office of Addictions and Mental Health and MLA for Cape Breton East, on behalf of Tory Rushton, the minister of Natural Resources and Renewables.

“This project is a prime example of how community-led projects can help us reach our collective goals."

The federal government is also spending over $1.1 million on the project, while the Eskasoni First Nation is contributing more than $245,000.

The total cost of the project is just under $1.5 million.

"Eskasoni First Nation is committed to finding ways to grow our renewable energy sector and find sustainable solutions that are environmentally conscious. We are moving towards green energy commercially and residentially and we are proud to do so," said Leroy Denny, the chief of the Eskasoni First Nation.

"As Mi'kmaq, we are always keeping the future generations at the forefront of our decision making in an effort to ensure environmental stewardship."

The provincial government has set a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 53 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030.