These indoor and outdoor team sports are now banned for adults in B.C. because of COVID-19

Empty basketball court. (Shutterstock)

A day after Dr. Bonnie Henry announced major changes to adult and youth team sports in B.C., a list of what exactly is restricted has been posted by the province.

During her COVID-19 briefing Wednesday, Henry said some activities like team sports and group fitness classes are risky during the pandemic, because the disease can spread so easily. She explained rules have changed not because people weren't following the guidelines, but because those guidelines are no longer enough.

"A number of these adult team sports are very much social gatherings as well as sports and unfortunately, those types of gatherings are leading to transmission events," Henry said Thursday.

"On the other hand we know the supervised sports for young people have not been the source of the same type of risk and transmission."

According to the province's website on COVID-19 restrictions updated on Dec. 3, all indoor and outdoor sports for people 19 and older are suspended. The following sports are included in that list:

  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Combat sports
  • Floor hockey
  • Floor ringette
  • Road hockey
  • Ice hockey
  • Ringette
  • Martial arts
  • Netball
  • Team skating
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
  • Indoor bowling
  • Lawn bowling
  • Curling
  • Lacrosse
  • Hockey
  • Ultimate
  • Rugby
  • Football
  • Baseball
  • Softball

Some high-intensity indoor group physical activities were already "prohibited indefinitely," including hot yoga and spin classes.

As well, some changes have been made to indoor and outdoor sports for those under 19. Games, tournaments and competitions are temporarily suspended, but individual drills and modified activities can continue. Spectators aren't allowed at any sport activities. 

On Wednesday, Henry said gyms where people exercise individually can stay open as long as they have a COVID-19 safety plan, and it is strictly followed. Group activities in those facilities can't operate, however. 

With files from CTV News Vancouver's Kendra Mangione