These ten roads are the worst in Quebec

Quebecers have voted for the worst roads in the province for 2022, but there are no Montreal streets on the list.

According to CAA-Quebec, 8,524 votes came in between April 26 and May 26.

"Thanks to public participation and CAA-Quebec's ongoing efforts year after year, this campaign achieves its main objective: to give Quebecers a platform to demand a safe and comfortable road network," said Sophie Gagnon, vice-president of public affairs and road safety for CAA-Quebec.

The top 10 worst roads, as voted by Quebecers, are:

  • de la Gappe Boulevard in Gatineau, Outaouais;
  • Route du Vieux-Moulin in Saint-Isidore, Chaudière-Appalaches;
  • Curé-Labelle Boulevard (Route 117) in Saint-Jérôme, Laurentians;
  • Cook Road in Gatineau, Outaouais;
  • Sainte-Brigitte Avenue in Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval, Capitale-Nationale;
  • Gourdeau Avenue in Saint-Agapit, Chaudière-Appalaches;
  • Saint-Sacrement Avenue in Quebec City, Capitale-Nationale;
  • Taniata Avenue in Lévis, Chaudière-Appalaches;
  • Sainte-Foy Road in Quebec City, Capitale-Nationale;
  • Route 105 in Gatineau, Outaouais.

When broken down by region, the worst streets in Montreal are:

  • Notre-Dame Street East;
  • Christophe-Colomb Avenue;
  • Sherbrooke Street East;
  • de l'Acadie Boulevard;
  • Papineau Avenue.

CAA-Quebec notes that as part of its campaign, it plans to contact authorities responsible for the 10 roads that received the most votes to notify them of their ranking and offer an opportunity to share how they plan to improve conditions.

"We'll also be following up a little later in the year to find out which roads have been repaired and what the game plan is for the others," the organization notes. 

MY VEHICLE GOT DAMAGED

CAA-Quebec says it receives many messages each year from drivers asking what recourse they have if their vehicle is damaged due to crumbling road infrastructure.

"We recommend that you do not file a claim for less than $1,000, whether or not the damage is caused by poor road conditions," said Suzanne Michaud, vice-president of insurance at CAA-Quebec. "With the deductible to be paid and the higher premiums that follow, it won't be worth your while."

In addition, CAA-Quebec states anyone who wants to sue for damage caused by a public road must prove that the responsible authority has been negligent, careless or is guilty of misconduct.

This information was compiled as part of CAA-Quebec's seventh annual Worst Roads campaign.