NDG borough mayor presents 'modest' budget over Zoom

The budget for the Cote-Des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-De-Grace (CDN-NDG) was released Thursday night with parks and traffic measures top among the Montreal borough's concerns.

Homeowners, however, may be relieved that their local property taxes won't be raised above inflation.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major effect on residents, and borough mayor Sue Montgomery said residents' quality of life remains her top concern.

"Given this pandemic, I'm sure we're going to be in this, I hate to say it, for another year, and people need the space to gather and to get out and get some fresh air and get some exercise," said Mongomery via a public Zoom meeting.

�� �� We want to hear from you #cdnndg! We have several public information sessions and consultations happening this fall including a session tonight on the 2021 budget https://t.co/Fk9aJuPFtG #polmtl #ndg #cotedesneiges

— suemontgomery (@MontgomerySue) September 24, 2020

Montgomery and the NDG council presented what Montgomery calls a relatively modest budget.

Local property taxes will increase two per cent, or about $5 on a $500,000 house.

Over the past year, money was spent on making streets more pedestrian and cyclist friendly, which has caused concern with some residents.

The Terrebonne bike path, for example, was swiftly removed after sparking disapproval among some residents.

One area that remains unchanged is the dangerous corner near Vendome Metro, the scene of accidents that caused the death of two elderly pedestrians this year.

"I'm very disappointed in the administration that they took this $8 million out of the city budget, so I've asked that we get it back, we'll see what happens," said Montgomery.

Housing remains a top priority with a hot rental market and renovictions on the rise.

"Nothing makes my blood boil like seeing landlords treat people like this," said Montgomery. "Especially vulnerable people from other countries who are too afraid to speak up and complain."

The borough mayor said she's hired more inspectors, is handing out more fines and following up on complaints.

Plans for more social housing, however, are slow going when so many are concerned about getting through the year. 

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