Memorial service held for RCMP Const. Heidi Stevenson, killed in N.S. mass shooting

An RCMP officer who was among 22 people killed in the 2020 Nova Scotia mass shooting was remembered Wednesday during a regimental service in Halifax for her "fierce" character and brave actions.

People lined a street leading to the service for Const. Heidi Stevenson, watching as Mounties and municipal police marched, bagpipers and drummers played, and a hearse brought the officer's urn to the ceremony at the Cole Harbour hockey arena.

COVID-19 restrictions had delayed the official ceremony, though a family funeral took place five days after Stevenson was killed.

RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki said during the service that Stevenson would be remembered for "her courage and strength of character."

She said the force will remember Stevenson's "heroism that day and the bravery she demonstrated and the actions she took to protect the community she cared so deeply about."

A public inquiry into the mass shooting has indicated that the veteran officer was racing to support an injured colleague on April 19, 2020, when the fatal encounter occurred on a highway interchange about 60 kilometres north of Halifax.

The 48-year-old officer died in a gunfight with the killer, who had jumped a lane of traffic in his replica police vehicle in order to drive the wrong way down a ramp and slam into Stevenson's cruiser.

Public inquiry documents say bullet fragments from Stevenson's pistol "likely" struck the killer's head, and -- about 35 minutes later -- blood on his forehead tipped off an officer who shot and killed the gunman at a gas station.

The inquiry has also noted that Stevenson had at 8:44 a.m. that morning called for the public to be notified about the killer driving a replica RCMP vehicle. Her request never received a response.

During the service, four friends noted her strong personality and sense of justice.

Her longtime friend Angela McKnight described Stevenson as a "fierce woman" who chose the RCMP over kinesiology and developed physical strength through playing rugby at university.

She said Stevenson had to undergo laser eye surgery and overcome a torn knee ligament in order to make it into the RCMP following her graduation.

"Heidi surrounded herself with strong women focused on supporting each other," she said. "I know no better ... no tougher, more determined woman than her."

Childhood friend Nona Heinbecker recalled Stevenson's sense of loyalty to her female friends, telling those gathered how the officer had happily found a spot to sleep on a hospital floor when Heinbecker was in labour.

People watching the procession to the service also described their admiration for Stevenson, who is survived by her husband and two children.

Randy Stevenson, a military veteran, and Jan Hill, whose husband had worked with the constable, were among those waiting on the sidewalk for the procession.

The veteran, who is not related to the fallen Mountie, described her as exemplifying "what the police and the military are about," while Hill praised the officer's deep involvement in her community of Dartmouth, N.S.

Heidi Stevenson grew up in Antigonish, N.S., and attended university in Nova Scotia. She was with the Mounties for 23 years, developing expertise in drug recognition, general duty policing and communications. She also spent time in Ottawa as part of the RCMP musical ride, even though she had no previous experience with horses.

In a statement provided to the inquiry, the Stevenson family said community support was helpful following her killing. "There were months of meals provided and seeing the Nova Scotia Strong stickers on everyone's car meant so much. The phone call from the Prime Minister was very personal," the family said in their statement.

Police estimated about 1,300 people attended the ceremony, which was broadcast live.

The Anglican minister presiding at the service noted Stevenson's Christian faith, and quoted from a New Testament text emphasizing that hope, faith and love "abide," and that love is the greatest of the three due to its eternal nature.

Rev. Katherine Bourbonniere said during her homily that even in death, "she (Stevenson) will constantly be trying to touch you in different ways."

She recalled accompanying Stevenson when she drove to homes to notify next of kin of a death. "I saw her love in her job and in her position many a time. She would show compassion for every person she met, and it was ... beautiful," she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 29, 2022.