If you haven't started already, it's OK to decorate and plan out your childrens' costumes for the scariest time of the year, says Alberta's top doc.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta's chief medical officer of health, confirmed during her Thursday update that Halloween will be going ahead as scheduled, but there will be some changes.

"I have no plans to suggest that Alberta cancel Halloween this year," she said. "My own children would never forgive me."

Halloween even has an advantage over other holidays, she said.

"In many ways, Halloween is actually safer to celebrate than other holidays. Unlike Thanksgiving for example, where families traditionally gather inside to have dinner together, most of Halloween's activities take place outdoors."

Of course, with the pandemic still ongoing, the holiday will need to be modified in the attempt to prevent COVID-19 infections. To that end, the province released a number of guidelines to help familiies.

They include not participating in any activities or trick-or-treating if you're feeling ill, practicing good hygiene and disinfecting candy packages that have been collected and take precautions such as wearing non-medical masks even under your traditional disguise and avoid touching doorbells and railings.

The province's documents also include a number of tips when it comes to handing out candy to eager trick-or-treaters.

"Ask trick-or-treaters to knock or call out instead of ringing the doorbell," it says. "Use tongs to hand out pre-packaged candy to avoid handling treats."

It even suggests coming up with creative ways, such as a "candy slide" or catapult to hand out items while avoiding physical contact.

There are still some parts of the holiday that should be avoided, Hinshaw said, such as holding large get-togethers and parties.

"Trick-or-treating should be done within your own cohort or family and staying within your community."

Full details and tips on how to have a safe and healthy Halloween can be found on the province's website.