In-person, distance-friendly events were few and far between, with most communities opting to take this year's Canada Day community events online.

One historian notes that using technology to get together is, in some ways, a throwback.

University of Guelph professor Matthew Hayday says this might feel new, but it's easy to forget we have been celebrating over the airwaves for decades.

“What’s old is new again,” remarks the history professor.

One of the most memorable celebrations for him took place in the 1970's.

“Millions of dollars were thrown at a July 1 extravaganza, and they made a big deal out of the latest technology at the time -- annex satellites. They were going to be used to hook up stages and homes and venues across the country,” explains Hayday.

Even when celebrating in large groups, technology connecting different locations is often used.

“We've got thousands of kilometres separating Canadians from each other and it’s about trying to create this imagined sense that we're doing things together, doing the same thing at the same time despite geography,” he says.

Proving that distance can just be a measurement and it is the spirit of the day that counts.

CTV Kitchener's very own virtual hour-long Canada Day celebration special can also be viewed on our website, including musical performances by local artists, to stories of first-hand experiences from the front lines.