Cassellholme LTC facility in North Bay being redeveloped

Cassellholme LTC home in North Bay, Ont. looks to become a state of the art facility. Redesigning all 240 beds in the home, and adding an additional 24. The home will also offer a specific unit for Indigenous people and a separate unit for people with dementia. June 4/21 (Jaime McKee/CTV News Northern Ontario)

The long-awaited redevelopment project at the Cassellholme LTC facility in North Bay now has a timeline and a price tag.

 

Officials told CTV News work will start this summer and should be complete within four to five years. 

 

“It means better suited infectious control, more space, ability for people to move around. It’s a game changer when it comes to how long-term care will be delivered in the Nipissing region,” said Jamie Lowery, CEO of Cassellholme. 

 

It’s a multi phase project worth more then 120 million dollars. 

 

The provincial government is investing 65 million dollars, while the City of North Bay owes about 80% of the remaining balance and the eight other municipalities in the region cover the rest of the cost. 

 

The other partner municipalities include East Ferris, Bonfield, Papineau-Cameron, Chisholm, Calvin, Mattawa, Mattawan, and South Algonquin.

 

“We are extremely comfortable with the pricing we’ve received,” said Chris Maybe who sits on the board at Casellholme. 

 

“We have had it confirmed by what’s called a quantify surveyor, basically as a third party they review all the costing and the details of construction. We’ve been told by our major potential funding partner Infrastructures Ontario, that right now the costs we received are less then what other average redevelopment projects in the province,” added Mayne. 

 

Cassellholme looks to become a state of the art facility. Redesigning all 240 beds in the home, and adding an additional 24. The home will also offer a specific unit for Indigenous people and a separate unit for people with dementia. 

 

“Cognitive impairments are on the rise. So having a designated provincial unit here is going to take some of the burden off some of the others homes, off of the hospital,” said Lowery. 

 

“The Long Term Care Act requires to provide those culturally safe spaces. The Indigenous community is a part of North Bay and the Nipissing region, a big part of it. So it only made sense to have a unit.”

 

Lowery said the development is broken down into six stages and that if all goes smoothly, the project will be complete by 2027.