'Grow with Kivi' tree planting event set for the weekend

This coming weekend, Kivi Park in Sudbury is hosting a green event.

Several local businesses have signed up to come out and plant 10,000 trees in two days.

The Kivi forest is a beautiful backdrop for many recreational activities. Officials said the park is the busiest it's been since opening in 2017.

"It's a great time of year to get out and because a lot of things are shut down, we have a lot of people who may not have experienced what Kivi is all about coming and trying it out and really enjoying it said Kerry Lamarche the executive director of Kivi Park.

"With the opening of Crawley Lake in two weeks, we are going to see a lot more, I think, taking in the paddle boarding, kayaking and canoeing that we offer out there."

The tree-planting event has been dubbed Grow with Kivi. In all, 20 local businesses have each donated $500 and volunteers will plant 10,000 trees June 5-6. The Sudbury based company A&M Remediation is supplying the coniferous trees to diversify the northern forest.

"If ever a disease or something ravages a forest or an area that can completely wipe out that whole stand of trees because that monoculture, that one species is susceptible to that disease," said Paul Thususka, president of A&M Remediation,

"And there are plenty of bugs and there are plenty of blights that can happen to tree."

In one plot at the park, seedlings that were planted four years ago and are thriving.

"Trees are just awesome, they are cool, they are rooted into the earth and I think that is a connection a lot of people are missing now," said Thususka. "I have three kids of my own, and a lot of times that phone is the greatest connections they have. To get connected to nature, to get connected to the earth, to get connected to a tree is really cool."

Grow with Kivi organizers said 19 businesses have signed up to plant plots and there is only one left.

A&M Remediation has committed to supplying more than 100,000 trees in the next five years to be planted throughout the 480-acre park.