Health Canada seizes unauthorized drugs from Metrotown store

Health Canada says it has seized several health products from a Burnaby retail store because they contain unauthorized drugs. (Health Canada)

Health Canada says it has seized several health products from a Burnaby retail store because they contain unauthorized drugs.

The federal agency says this is the third time it has seized such products from stores run by the same owner.

The products seized from Tokyo Beauty in the Metropolis at Metrotown mall include an acne gel, an antibiotic cream, eye drops and eye washes, Health Canada says in a news release.

Each of the products seized is labeled as containing prescription drugs, which should only be taken under the advice and supervision of a health-care professional, according to Health Canada.

Prescription drugs can also only be sold, legally, to people who have a prescription, the agency says.

"Selling unauthorized drugs is illegal in Canada," Health Canada says in its release. "Unauthorized drugs have not been approved by Health Canada, which means that they have not been assessed for safety, effectiveness and quality and may pose serious health risks."

Health Canada says it has previously seized many of the same products from another Tokyo Beauty location in Richmond, which has the same owner. The agency issued warnings about the products in March of this year and in February 2019

"The department will continue to take action to stop this illegal activity and update Canadians as needed," Health Canada says.

Each of the products seized contains at least one of the following prescription drugs:

  • Aminocaproic acid, which is used to decrease bleeding
  • Clindamycin, which is used to treat bacterial infections
  • Gentamicin, which is a prescription antibiotic used to treat minor skin infections
  • Neostigmine methylsulfate, which is similar to drugs that have been used to treat glaucoma in the past. There are currently no approved eye drops containing neostigmine methylsulfate in Canada.

The full list of seized products, as well as side-effects of the listed drugs, can be found on the Health Canada website