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Warmer-than-normal weather will likely continue throughout the season. (Pexels)

In celebration of Thanksgiving weekend, here’s a look at the best places to see trees donning their fall colours around the Greater Toronto Area. 

Ontario’s latest fall colour progression report states that the best places to see the fall colours are in more northern parts of Ontario, where parks and cities are reporting up to 90 per cent colour change.

If you want to make the trip, some of the favourite places to visit are Algonquin Provincial Park, and along the French River. However, there are also places closer to home where you can see the start of the fall glory this weekend.

York region

If you are in York region, head to the Kortright Centre for Conservation to enjoy the fall colours celebration Saturday, Sunday and Monday. There you can take a self-guided tour to see bright orange and yellow leaves, and learn about the changes autumn brings to the natural world.

Durham region

The best way to see the fall colours in Durham region is to take a ride on the Heritage Train. You can get aboard one of its heated 1950’s heritage cars and travel through the Oak Ridges Moraine to see the lime chartreuse, yellow and some pops of bright orange leaves.

Toronto

It’s no secret that High Park is one of the best places to catch fall colours in Toronto. You could simply take a stroll through the forest to see the changing leaves, which are mostly yellow and green right now with bursts of vibrant red and orange, or you could attend a fall festival. On Saturday, High Park is hosting a Indigenous family nature walk, and art making session. 

Caledon, Ont.

A drive along the Escarpment Side Road in Caledon is the ideal way to see the fall colours and to see panoramic views of Toronto in the area. As you travel along the winding roads, you can spot dull and rusty oranges leaves, as well as yellow leaves and pops of bright red and orange.

Burlington, Ont.

A trip down to Burlington in the fall is not complete without a visit to the Royal Botanical Gardens, where Japanese maple trees are changing colour. You can also visit the Arboretum, where you can see chestnut, maple and yellow buckeye trees starting to change. The fall colour change is at its infancy in Burlington so most of the leaves are green with only pockets of red.