IN PICTURES: How children who died in residential schools were honoured in Manitoba

Orange flags that have been set up outside the Manitoba Legislature to honour the children who died in residential schools. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

Leading up to Canada Day, calls from the across the country came in to cancel the holiday after hundreds of unmarked graves were discovered at former residential schools throughout Canada.

Demonstrations have been held all over the country, including in Manitoba.

Protesters gathered outside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Thursday for a No Pride in Genocide Walk and Ride.

Protesters outside the Canadian Museum of Human Rights honouring kids who died at residential schools. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

Dennis Meeches, the chief of Long Plain First Nations, wants the Canadian government to recognize residential schools, day schools and the Sixties Scoop as genocide.

"We love Canada, but we do have a shameful past," said Meeches. "To come together and walk in true partnership as it was intended in the treaties and we do need Canada to atone for its sins. Canada and the churches to atone for the sins of the past, and their trespassing against Indigenous children."

Manitoba NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine speaking outside the Canadian Museum of Human Rights. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

Manitobans walking in protest as part of the No Pride in Genocide Walk and Ride in Winnipeg. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

Manitoba NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine, who is also a member of the Sagkeeng Anishinaabe First Nation, explained why she and others are not celebrating Canada Day.

"Today is a day to reflect, honour, and stand in solidarity with Indigenous people, while embracing a hard truth. As uncomfortable as it may make us, there is no reconciliation on our territories," said Fontaine.

Demonstrators continued their walk to Portage Avenue and Main Street and throughout Downtown Winnipeg wearing their orange shirts.

Manitobans at Portage and Main during the No Pride in Genocide Walk and Ride in Winnipeg. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

Orange flags that have been set up outside the Manitoba Legislature to honour the children who died in residential schools. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

People later in the day gathered at the Manitoba Legislature where children's shoes were placed on the steps to symbolize the children who died at residential schools and flags were placed throughout the front lawn of the legislative grounds.

Children's shoes on the Legislature steps symbolizing the children who died in residential schools. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)

During the demonstration in front of the legislature Thursday afternoon, some of the demonstrators could be seen bringing down the statue of Queen Victoria.

The statue could be seen on the ground covered in red paint, while its base was covered in red paint hand prints.

The Queen Victoria statue outside the Manitoba Legislature was taken down by demonstrators and covered in paint on Thursday, July 1, 2021. (Source: Gary Robson/CTV News)