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Jason McKay is pictured leaving court on Jan. 24, 2019.

Jason McKay showed little emotion as he was convicted as charged, of second-degree murder, in a Regina courtroom on Friday.

He stood trial for three weeks for the stabbing death of his wife, Jenny McKay, in 2017.

Family and friends of Jenny were on hand, and shed tears following the verdict.

“I am so happy beyond belief that he got second-degree murder,” Colette Toupin, Jenny’s friend, told reporters through tears.  “Now we just need to go to the harshest sentence and we’ll be so happy,”

A lot of emotion inside and outside of the courtroom following that verdict. Jenny’s family and friends are consoling eachother in the hallway. Jason’s daughters are shedding tears in the gallery. We’re on a short break before returning to discuss sentencing. #yqr

— Michaela Solomon (@michaelaCTV) January 31, 2020

Crown prosecutor Adam Breker told CTV News that he thinks there is precedent to ask for an increase in parole eligibility.

“The fact that this was a domestic homicide is very significant, as well as the nature of the crime itself,” Breker said. “Any past history that [Jason] may have on his record are all very relevant aspects, in terms of how we’ll formulate our opinion of the appropriate sentencing.”

Second-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence, without eligibility for parole for 10 years.

The judge’s decision

After walking the room through the sequence of events, evidence and the various testimonies given, Justice Michael Tochor decided he could not consider Jason’s testimony as it was “plagued by inconsistencies”. 

Tochor referenced the differences between Jason’s testimony on the stand and his interview with police that directly followed his arrest.

“These inconsistencies seriously erode his credibility”, Tochor told the courtroom.

Also calls into question Jason’s testimony that his and Jenny’s relationship was good besides the problems with alcohol, pointing to previous problems court has heard about. #yqr

— Cole Davenport (@CTVCole) January 31, 2020

Tochor ruled the Crown was able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt in its case that Jason had the necessary intent the night of his wife Jenny’s death in September, 2017.

Tochor called the killing a “tragic event” - and found Jason guilty of second-degree murder.

His daughters sobbed in the gallery.

Sentencing is scheduled for April 3.