Local group builds, donates food banks to Calgary communities in need

While this is the second collaboration with Main Street Equity, Syed Hassan of Love forAssociation says his group has already donated five other food banks in areas across Calgary. Those include the neighbourhoods of Saddle Ridge, Whitehorn, Ranchlands, Taradale, and Forest Lawn.

In an effort to meet basic needs in Calgary communities hit hard by the pandemic, the Love for Humanity Association has built and delivered six community food banks across the city.

The latest structure, furnished with several shelves and sealing cabinet doors, was unveiled Tuesday at 360 Falshire Drive N.E. The food bank stands on the grounds of Falcon Crest Village Apartments, a 177-unit complex owned by Main Street Equity. This is the second Main Street location to house a community food bank, with the other located at a complex in Forest Lawn.

“We started with a food bank in Forest Lawn, and it’s emptied daily,” said Sheena Reyes Keslick, VP of Operations with Main Street Equity. “Based on that demand, we felt the Falcon Crest area would be ideal for the next food bank; there are a ton of families here that we felt could be in need and could benefit,” added Keslick.

While this is the second collaboration with Main Street Equity, Syed Hassan of Love for Humanity Association said his group has already donated five other food banks in areas across Calgary.  Those include the neighbourhoods of Saddle Ridge, Whitehorn, Ranchlands, Taradale, and Forest Lawn.

'SYMBOL OF LOVE TO ALL CANADIANS'

All building materials are purchased by Hassan and he manufactures the structures with a group of volunteers in his garage.

“It’s a hard job, but when we finish the work, we look at it as a symbol of love to all Canadians, regardless of colour or religion,” stated Hassan as he loaded food items into the Falshire food bank.

“This is the right time to give back to the community,” he added.

Hassan said the food banks are accessible 24 hours a day, and are designed with one side for donations and one side with items available for those in need.

“This is a critical situation, a lot of people are struggling, our request is for people to participate in this campaign, and do your best,” said Hassan.

Keslick said the Main Street locations will house the food banks indefinitely. “We have no plans on removing them, we’ll continue to aid in filling them with food and hope that the community gives what they can.”

“People should not go without any necessity in Calgary, and food is a necessity,” she said.

The Love for Humanity Association food banks are open to any member of the public and donations are encouraged to be sanitized, non-perishable food items.