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The last pickup truck to roll off the Oshawa GM assembly was raffled of for the Durham Children's Aid Foundation. (Mike Walker/CTV News Toronto)

Michel Roy is still in shock after becoming the owner of a 2019 GMC Sierra, the last truck to roll off the assembly line at the Oshawa General Motor’s Assembly Plant.

“It’s very emotional to own this vehicle, it’s bittersweet,” Roy said.

The Bowmanville, Ont. man was based at the assembly plant for nine years, working for parts supplier Ceva Logistics.

The pickup truck rolled off the assembly line on Dec. 18, 2019, marking the end of more than a century of vehicle production in Oshawa. The automaker will continue to use the plant to produce parts.

About 2,600 GM employees lost their jobs, as well as hundreds more like Roy at part suppliers.

GM Canada donated the truck to a raffle for plant employees, with all proceeds supporting programs at the Durham Children’s Aid Foundation. About 8,000 thousand tickets were sold and $117,000 was raised.

Roy only bought one ticket for $30 and never imagined he would win.

“I was very shocked when I got the phone call and was told I was the winner, knowing that I could have the piece of the history,” he said. “I never won anything like this before.”

Roy picked up the truck last week at Mills Motors in Oshawa. He has marked the historic win with the custom licence “LAST1SAM,” a nod to GM Canada’s founder Robert Samuel McLaughlin.

What makes owning this pickup truck even more special is the dozens of signatures on parts under the hood and door panels from the assembly workers who had a part in building this truck.

“Many hours of work went into these vehicles and it was a sad day to see General Motors in Oshawa come to an end as far as vehicle production goes,” Roy said.

Roy admits he enjoys driving the vehicle and always dreamed of owning a Sierra, but he has no intentions of racking up the mileage or using it tow a trailer.

“I’m going to preserve it and keep it in its original condition if possible,” he said. “It’s more the sentimental value and the history behind the workers.”

Instead, he will keep it safe in storage and enjoy the truck and its history much more off the road.