A number of people have been charged and fined after police responded to complaints of partying, noise and violations of the Liquor Control and Health Protection acts on Halloween night in Wolfville, N.S. -- home of Acadia University.

RCMP say nine individuals were charged and fined on Oct. 31 in the Town of Wolfville under the province’s Emergency Management Act.

At approximately 11:15 p.m., police responded to a large gathering at a residence on Highland Ave. An adult male was charged and fined $582.50 for failing to comply with the Emergency Management Act Section 23 (a).

Just before midnight, police responded to a large gathering on Willow Ave., that they estimated to be over 80 people. Four adults were charged and fined $697.50 for failing to comply with the Emergency Management Act Section 23 (b). One person was also charged and fined $352.50 under Wolfville's prevention of excessive noise bylaw for occupier allowing or permitting activity prohibited by subsection 4(4) in a dwelling unit.

Just after midnight, RCMP responded to a third call of a large gathering on Westwood Ave., that they estimated to be over 50 people. Four adults were charged and fined $697.50 for failing to comply with the Emergency Management Act Section 23 (b).

"I’ll be blunt," said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health. "They’re putting all of us at risk so stop being selfish."

RCMP would not confirm whether the charged adults were students at Wolfville’s Acadia University. 

"(They were) university-aged adults, however we don’t follow through to inquire whether they’re students or not," said Const. Jeff Wilson of the Wolfville RCMP.

CTV News has confirmed the residents fined at one of the houses are Acadia students.

Other Acadia students admitted to partying this year and said more house parties are happening because the clubs aren’t open. When asked why they’re going to parties even though there are rules against large gatherings, they said they're trying to enjoy their fourth year as much as possible.

"Follow the rules," Strang said. "We’re working very hard to find a balance to allow people to still have social and other kind of activities."

That's a message echoed by Wendy Donovan, the mayor of Wolfville.

"A community of real people who want to live their life too who don’t want be stuck in their houses, who want to get out of this, who want to visit their grandkids," Donovan said.

A spokesperson for Acadia says as difficult as it is to learn there are improper gatherings at private residences, they are more impressed by the vast majority of their students who are following the rules.