Spike in COVID-19 cases is pushing New Brunswick's health-care system to the limit

New Brunswick's jump in COVID-19 cases has overloaded the health-care system this week.

The Horizon Health Network is now looking to hire more staff across the province to help with the growing demand for testing and vaccinations.

The health network has seen an increased demand in testing as COVID-19 cases have soared over the last month.

"Two weeks ago, if you wanted a test, you could walk in or call and get it at almost anytime you wanted," said Dr. Jeff Steeves with New Brunswick's Medical Society.

But now, assessment centres are seeing long line ups and delays in testing.

Steeves wants people to get the jab and practice caution during this time to prevent overloading the system even more.

"Remember, we were running short even before COVID, so we're trying to maintain that," Steeves said. "Therefore, we can't divert the staff like we did before, hence the call for new staff."

Horizon Health's vice-president said in a statement Friday that they are currently looking to recruit staff at vaccination clinics, assessment centres and school clinics in Moncton, Saint John and Fredericton.

"Given the recent rise in COVID activity in New Brunswick, and the increased demand for these services, we are hoping to replenish our pool of available clinicians and administrative support staff as we ramp up activity at these locations," said Jean Daigle.

Since the province announced proof of vaccination requirements this week, public health has reported a significant jump in vaccination appointments.

On Wednesday, 1,700 appointments were booked, while yesterday there were 1,929.

Health officials say prior to Wednesday's number, the recent average for vaccinations was 600 bookings per day. On Thursday, 600 additional vaccines had to be delivered to a clinic in Moncton.

"Things have picked up dramatically," said Fredericton pharmacist Alistair Bursary, who says they've been busy taking calls from people looking to get their first or second dose.

"So, whereas we were doing perhaps 10 patients a day on average now we are probably going to hit 40-50 just at our pharmacy alone," Bursary said.

While the demand for services continue to climb, those working on the frontlines hope to get the help they need sooner rather than later.