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After giving dividends to police and the province, the City of Edmonton earned about $57 million from speed cameras in 2019.

The data was presented to city council Wednesday in reports about enforcement, collisions, safety, costs and driver feedback.

Councillors heard photo radar locations which also had a “speed feedback sign” have cut crashes by 35 to 45 per cent since the city adopted Vision Zero five years ago. The signs are estimated to reduce speeding by up to 12 km/h and cost $6,500 per stationary unit, $12,000 per mobile unit, and about $125,000 in operating costs.

According to the reports, ticket revenue

These are the Edmonton photo radar locations where drivers have received the most tickets:

 

Issued tickets 2016-2018

Total collisions 2017-2019

Gateway Boulevard at Ellerslie Road SW - northbound

51,221

10

Stony Plain Road between 178 and 182 Street - westbound

43,553*

29

Whitemud Drive between 50 and 75 Street - westbound

13,674*

18

Yellowhead Trail at 7710 Yellowhead Trail - westbound 

29,959

8

Anthony Henday Drive at Yellowhead Trail - southbound 

20,837

30

Yellowhead Trail at Anthony Henday Drive - eastbound 

29,809

7

Anthony Henday Drive at Ray Gibbon Drive - eastbound 

38,161

11

82 Avenue between 91 and 95A Street - westbound 

20,122

26

82 Avenue between 89 and 87 Street - east bound 

24,201

38

Whitemud Drive at 50 Street - westbound 

8,088*

8

* indicates data for three-year total was partially unavailable 

And the locations where speedsters were most frequently reported to 311? Summerside Drive, Silver Berry Road, 176 Avenue between the 97th and 112th street blocks, and Millwoods Road.

Any changes council wants to make to the photo radar program will likely have to wait until a provincial review is complete.

The Alberta government issued a moratorium on adding new photo radar locations Dec. 1, 2019, pending the review of municipal goals and outcomes of automated enforcement.

City administration says it has been included in “initial discussion.”