In this Feb. 8, 2017 photo, a northern long-eared bat, is held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, in Cleveland. (AP / Tony Dejak)

Two bats from Grey Bruce have come back positive for rabies, according to Grey Bruce Health Unit.

One of the bats from was The Blue Mountains while the other found in Brockton.

Officials are investigating both incidents to ensure no risk to the health of residents in the area.

What is interesting to note is that there were no known positive animals last year and only one in 2018.

Rabies is a preventable disease that can affect the brain (central nervous system) of a human or animal that contracts it. It can cause death to unprotected animals as well as fatal to humans if not addressed quickly.

The virus can transmit to humans or other animals "through a bite, or if the saliva comes in contact with a cut, scratch or the moist tissues of the mouth, nose or eyes", the Health Unit says.

Exposure can be prevented by:

  • Not feeding or touching a wild or unknown animal, an animal acting strangely or an animal that appears to be sick or injured.
  • Keeping pets under control at all times.
  • To help prevent the spread of rabies in Ontario, it is the law to immunize cats, dogs, and ferrets. Livestock (including horses, cattle and sheep) that may have contact with the general public must also be immunized.

The health unit explains that there is no treatment to rid oneself of rabies once the symptoms appear.