The new bins will be popping up across the city's downtown, urban villages and parks in the months to come. (City of Victoria)

The City of Victoria has rolled out the first of its new "zero-waste stations" in an effort to improve composting and recycling options at public trash cans.

The first of the new colour-coded bins were installed at the corner of Government and Humboldt streets in the city's downtown core.

Each station will feature three containers for composting, recycling and garbage.

The city said in a statement Friday the bins won't just help divert recyclables and compost from the landfill, but will also require less contact and lifting from city workers.

Mayor Lisa Helps says over one tonne of waste is generated every day on Victoria streets and parks, costing the city $5 million to manage.

A 2019 audit of the city's waste found more than 13,000 recyclable paper coffee cups go into Victoria trash cans every day.

While the current downtown waste bins are emptied twice a day and require manual lifting, the new designs incorporate larger wheeled containers and effectively double their capacity, saving time and money, the city says.

The new bins will be popping up across the city's downtown, urban villages and parks in the months to come.