As the Winterloo Festival pivots, one local snow sculptor is inspiring people of all ages to create their own art.

The annual event usually sees people flocking to Waterloo Region, but like so many others, it too has shad to pivot.

Matt Morris is helping with that by carving out a new way for people to enjoy winter.

"With Winterloo we had to totally change it up this year," he said. "So I sort of carved in secret so there wouldn't be a crowd. We wanted to make sure that there wasn't any issues that way."

Snow sculptures are spread out around Uptown Waterloo for the public to enjoy, but Morris' latest creation, the iconic Leaning Tower of Pisa, is sitting right on his own front lawn.

He says the best part for him is to see the reaction of people's faces when they're out for a walk or driving by.

Morris adds that this is his small way of giving back and hopefully lifting people's spirits.

William Slofstra and his family saw the snow replica of the tower and couldn't help but reminisce on a trip they once took to Italy.

"We love to go for walks all the time, it's just great to get out of the house, but this is a plus," he said. "Just looking at it was a neat reminder."

Last summer, Morris created an online snow sculpting club. Isla and Wesley Sloss, two junior snow sculptors in Waterloo, have been putting his tips to good use.

"I was just looking at pictures online and what to make and I just thought of an avocado," said Isla. "I learned some of it from Matt and some of it from my brother."

Wesley adds that their sculptures make people light up.

"Usually they just slow down and start taking pictures, and if we're out here they tell us good job and give us thumbs up," he said. "It makes me feel pretty proud."

For those looking to try their hand at snow sculpting, Morris says they just have to let the snow sinter, meaning to let it go through a melting and freezing phase. If that's done, heavy packing snow isn't a necessity.