A woman who says she was sexually assaulted at her doctor's office in Springhill is sharing her story publicly. 

An expected publication ban led CTV News to not identify who she is.

She has several concerns with what she says happened, including whether the doctor's conditions were being monitored.

This past summer, she went to the doctor for stomach issues.

Once alone with the doctor in the exam room, she says he locked the door and performed an inappropriate exam.

"I obviously felt violated," said the alleged victim. "I was hurt. I felt betrayed because I did feel like I had a good rapport with him."

It was July 31 in Springhill, N.S. She says she immediately went to police and days later, the college of physicians and surgeons.

Three-and-a-half months later, the RCMP charged Dr. Tim Fashoranti with sexual assault.

"In my opinion, it took way longer than it should've," said the alleged victim.

Fashoranti's clinic is now closed after the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia placed an interim suspension on his license on November 12 when police laid the charge.

"An independent Investigations Committee imposed an interim suspension on the licence of Dr. Fashoranti, during such time the investigation is ongoing," said Dr. Gus Grant, the registrar and CEO of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia.

Fashoranti has been investigated by the college before. In 2014, it found Fashoranti engaged in an inappropriate examination of a female patient and ever since, he's had to be chaperoned while seeing female patients. 

After this woman's complaint in August, his license was suspended again, but reinstated with more conditions including:

  • That a practice monitor be present for all patient interaction; and,
  • Signs of the rules be posted.

"Which was kind of unsettling for me because he had broke his condition," said the alleged victim. "I do question what they were doing periodically to monitor that he was following the conditions."

She says he was not chaperone during her visit as required by condition.

The allegations have not been tested in court.

Through his lawyer, Fashoranti denied CTV's request for an interview. His lawyer, Stanley MacDonald, wrote:

"Dr. Fashoranti denies the complainant's allegations and will contest those allegations in an open and impartial court."

When we asked the college what they had done to monitor the conditions that were previously in place, we were told by Pattie Lacroix, the director of communications and policy for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia:

"While an investigation is ongoing the college is not permitted to comment on matters related."

For this woman the last few months have been a challenge.

She's seeking regular therapy, but finds power in the pain, through speaking.

When asked why she chose to speak to CTV News, the alleged victim said: "I think it's important to speak out and I think it's important if there was any victims out there, now is the time to come forward."

Two weeks ago, the RCMP said there may be other victims, but confirmed Friday that no other charges have been laid. The Medical Act allows a doctor with an interim suspension 30 days to appear before a committee to contest it.