DAY 49 - The COVID-19 Daily Podcast with Dave Trafford

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This is DAY  49   of the COVID-19 pandemic.   Here’s what you need to know on    Tuesday, April 28, 2020   <<<<>>>  New COVID-19 modelling shows curve flattening  in Canada but the model suggest there could be up to 3,883 deaths by May 5.   Meanwhile the prime minister and premiers release guidelines to reopening economy across the country.     Yesterday, Quebec announced daycares and primary schools will be back in business in a few weeks. And it’s a move that has divided medical opinion across the country.   It’s also cause for a difference of political opinion. Ontario’s Premier Doug Ford says he won’t send kids back to school until public health officials tell him it makes sense to do so.   Today, Ford said he would be releasing “clear, sector-specific labour guidelines” later this week for how businesses will be able to operate once the economy eventually reopens.   He made the comments on the same day Ontario recorded its single day high in COVID-19 deaths at 59.   B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said April 22 that she wants to see "at least a couple of days" without any new COVID-19 cases before officials start easing restrictions.   Alberta has not yet released plans to reopen its economy. Premier Jason Kenney said in a news conference that a committee will meet this week to discuss a relaunch strategy.   The first phase of Saskatchewan's five-phase reopening will begin May 4. Premier Scott Moe says the dates of the later phases will be determined through monitoring COVID-19 cases in the prior phases.   Premier Brian Pallister said Manitoba will be releasing information on how it plans to reopen non-essential businesses in the province this week.   Newfoundland Premier Dwight Ball said that it is not yet time for the province to reopen the economy, despite the province reporting no new case numbers or single-digit increases for the last nine days.   New Brunswick loosened some of its physical distancing measures last Friday after its seventh straight day with no new cases of COVID-19.   Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health, said last week that there are no immediate plans to lift any COVID-19 restrictions but the province is currently working on a plan about the gradual lifting of restrictions to be discussed with the premier this week.   Officials in Prince Edward Island have announced it is planning to ease some public health measures imposed amid the COVID-19 pandemic starting May 1.   Yukon's chief medical officer Dr. Brendan Hanley said April 24 that the process of developing a reopening plan for the territory is underway but won't be available for several weeks.   All five of the Northwest Territories' coronavirus cases are now in recovery, but health officials say COVID-19 restrictions in the territory are expected to continue for at least another month.   Nunavut has not announced any plans to reopen its economy. As of April 27, there were no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the territory.   The Canadian Medical Association has called for greater government transparency about the available supply of protective equipment in light of a new survey that suggests most respondents have seen no improvements in the last month. A recent survey of nearly 2,500 doctors across Canada found 42 per cent had seen no change in the supply of gear such as masks and face shields in the last month, while 29 per cent felt the supply is now worse.   Canadians divided over making COVID-19 vaccine mandatory A poll conducted by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies found that while 60 per cent of respondents believe people should be required to get the vaccine once it is ready, the other 40 per cent think it should be voluntary.   Canadian officials are turning their attention to digital contact tracing to prevent the spread of coronavirus. Officials in Newfoundland and Labrador are the latest in Canada to suggest the use of voluntary contact tracing apps that would use cellphone data to monitor people’s movements and warn them of any contact with COVID-19 positive patients. And it was an historic day in Ottawa. The House of Commons held its first virtual sitting via a ZOOM call with all 338 MPs. And it went as most of your Zoom meetings might be going… <<<>>>  I’m thinking the Speaker of the HOUSE would love to have 338 mute buttons in the Commons. The Prime Minister of New Zealand got an unexpected call yesterday. Queen Elizabeth was on the phone for Jacina Ardern. Her Majesty said she was just calling to catch up and see how everyone in New Zealand was getting on amidst COVID-19” <<<>>>  With all the focus on getting our economy back to business, there are plenty of questions of what business will look like. BNN Bloomberg is reporting that COVID-19 could cause a financial crisis 10 times worse than what we saw in 2008. How many businesses will be able to get back to business? Particularly small and medium sized enterprises. Last Thursday, the federal government announced plans to help those smaller operations pay their rent. <<<>>>    IF YOU HAVE A STORY ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE YOU WANT TO SHARE…send me an email. DAVE@DAVETRAFFORD.COM or connect with me on TWITTER @DaveTrafford.     DISCLAIMER: THE VIEWPOINTS EXPRESSED IN THIS PODCAST REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE HOST AND PARTICIPANTS AS OF THE DATE OF PUBLICATION AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL ADVICE AND BEST PRACTICES BY LEADING MEDICAL AUTHORITIES AS THE INFORMATION SURROUNDING THE CURRENT CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC IS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING.